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We are constantly looking for motivated Bachelor, Master and PhD students as well as PostDocs with interests in the theoretical and numerical analysis of light matter interaction in micro- and nanooptical systems. If you would like to join our group while working in the context of any of our research activities, please do not hesitate to contact us.

In particular we currently offer PhD theses on:

In particular we currently offer Master theses on:

PhD thesis on Chiral Light-Matter-Interactions

The context of the work is the interaction between the electromagnetic field and chiral matter, like chiral molecules, or artificial chiral nanostructures. In particular, the main idea is to further the current understanding of electromagnetic chirality measures related to the question: How chiral is an object? A general object in such consideration will be represented by its scattering operator (far-field operator). It is foreseen that the transformation properties of the scattering operator under physically relevant groups will be one of the main subjects of study. Improving the ways that material chirality is quantified can have an impact both in practical problems like sensing of chiral molecules, and in solving theoretical puzzles like the decades-old chiral zeros problem. Also, aspects related to the actual design of electromagnetically chiral objects are important in this research. The work is done collaboratively with a researcher from the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

Contact for further information and application

Dr. Ivan Fernandez-Corbaton

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

 

PhD thesis on Theory of Photonic Wirebonds

We are looking for a scientist that works on the efficient description of light propagation in photonic wire bonds, their integration into entire systems, and the exploration of novel physical concepts for their design. Photonic wire bonds, in general, are freeform waveguides that connect different components of integrated photonic chips. The topics for the research associate are diverse and, depending on the background and interest, the main focus can be on of the following aspects: (i) Development of modal techniques to predict highly efficient the losses of photonic wire bonds of a given trajectory, (ii) the use of neural networks for the same purpose, or (iii) the exploration of different novel physical concepts to render the photonic wire bonds lossless by design, e.g. while exploiting the concept of super symmetry or topological aspects. The work is done collaboratively with a researcher from the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

 

PhD thesis on Theory of Metamaterials

We are looking for a scientist that works on the homogenization of metamaterials. While frequently local constitutive relations have been considered for this purpose, we concentrate here on nonlocal ones. This means, for example, that the polarization not just depends on the electric field but also on higher order gradients thereof. An analytical approach to derive such constitutive relation exists as a starting point. We are then interested to study eigemodes in such media, to identify appropriate interface conditions, and to homogenize actual metamaterials. These can be dielectric or metallic metamaterials. We wish to explore novel physical effects that can be encountered in nonlocal metamaterials but also wish to develop novel techniques for the retrieval based on, e.g., deep neural networks or other approaches from the field of machine learning. The work is done collaboratively with a researcher from the Department of Mathematics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

 

Master thesis on Optimal measurements for phase estimation with a noisy Mach-Zehnder interferometer

Although an ultimate quantum Cramér-Rao bound on the precision of estimation error has been investigated for various quantum metrological scenarios, the optimal measurement that reaches the ultimate limit has rarely been identified. Such issue also applies to the case of optical interferometric schemes for the gravitational wave detection. In this Master thesis project, we aim to look for optimal measurement settings for phase estimation with a noisy Mach-Zehnder interferometer, applicable to one of the typical gravitational wave detectors. Experimentally implementable optimal or nearly optimal setup will also be explored. The student will learn lots of theoretical techniques for quantum metrology, and will also get a chance to address one of utmost important issues in quantum technology, whose significance arises simultaneously over the world.  

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

Dr. Changhyoup Lee