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We are constantly looking for motivated Master and PhD students as well as PostDocs with interests in the theoretical and numerical analysis of light matter interaction in micro- and nanooptical systems. If you would like to join our group while working in the context of any of our research activities, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Master thesis on Designing photonic nanostructures with machine learning algorithms  

Machine learning algorithms promise to design photonic structures with properties on demand from a large amount of previously computed data. In machine learning approaches, the algorithm is first in a training phase that requires many simulations of the actual forward problem. Afterwards, the structures are optimised in a recall phase that does not require any forward simulations. 

It is the purpose of this master thesis apply machine learning algorithms to some selected design problems in our group in the context of self-assembled metamaterials. In the initial phase of the thesis an in-house code for the simulation of photonic clusters consisting of a larger number of spheres shall be used. In the cause of time, also other methods shall be used to tackle different scientific challenges. 

 

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

 

Master thesis on High efficiency single photon detectors

In close collaboration with the group from Prof. W. Pernice (KIT-INT and University of Münster), we are looking for a master student that shall work both theoretically/numerically and experimentally on the implementation of high performance single photon detectors using modern nano-optical concepts. You should be interested in understanding and manipulating the light propagation in nanostructured optical systems using photonic crystal concepts, to fabricate and characterise such devices in a proper clean room environment, and to verify the functionality of the single photon detectors.  

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

Prof. Wolfram Pernice

 

Master thesis on Quantum state engineering in quantum nanophotonic platforms

The generation of quantum states of light and its reliable controllability are highly required to realize various quantum applications in the context of, e.g., quantum simulation, quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology. It is the purpose of this master thesis to develop a novel scheme that generates nonclassical state of light (e.g., single photon, squeezed state, or more specialized states) and manipulates its nonclassical properties in a well-controlled manner using different plasmonic platforms (e.g., metallic waveguides, nanoparticles, or metamaterials). The project exploits particular methods such as the driven-dissipative approach, the photon-catalysis, or nonlinearity-induced photon control. The master thesis is theoretical but shall be done in close collaboration with experimental partners that aim to implement our theoretical scheme. 

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

Dr. Changhyoup Lee

 

Master thesis on Quantum nanophotonic sensing and imaging

Nonclassical properties (e.g., sub-Poissonian photon-number distribution or entanglement) of an input state of light enables a photonic sensor to achieve much higher sensitivity or more precise measurement well beyond the standard quantum limit. With the advancement of experimental nanophotonic technologies, the master project aims to successfully implement quantum metrological ideas in particular nanophotonic sensors, making use of both classical mode properties and quantum features of light. The student will develop novel sensing schemes that are feasible and robust to realistic losses in particular nanophotonic platforms, e.g., the surface plasmon resonance sensor— one of the most successful photonic sensor at the classical level. The master thesis is theoretical but shall be done in close collaboration with experimental partners that aim to implement our theoretical schemes. 

Contact for further information and application

Prof. Carsten Rockstuhl

Dr. Changhyoup Lee